Conservation charity Buglife is creating 150,000 hectares of so-called ‘bee corridors’ in the English countryside in order to help save the pollinating insects from their alarmingly rapid decline in numbers over recent years.

The organisation is restoring wildflower pathways destroyed by modern agriculture, and creating new ones, in a programme called the B-Lines network.  Since the 1940s, 97% of UK land that once hosted wildflowers has been lost due to farming or out-of-town developments.  It is estimated that unless historic habitats are restored, between 40% and 70% of insects generally could become extinct, simply because there is not enough suitable land and flora to sustain them.

Buglife began mapping out the B-Lines network in 2014, with financial support from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and in partnership with other organisations such as wildlife trusts, local councils and landowners.  “If farmers are choosing where to create more hedgerows or field margins, the map shows them where to focus their efforts,” said Nature Friendly Farming Network’s Martin Lines.

Hopefully these corridors will save England’s bees from extinction, and will be replicated in other locations where the vital pollinators are under threat.

further reading…

Conservation charity Buglife is creating 150,000 hectares of so-called ‘bee corridors’ in the English countryside in order to help save the pollinating insects from their alarmingly rapid decline in numbers over recent years.

The organisation is restoring wildflower pathways destroyed by modern agriculture, and creating new ones, in a programme called the B-Lines network.  Since the 1940s, 97% of UK land that once hosted wildflowers has been lost due to farming or out-of-town developments.  It is estimated that unless historic habitats are restored, between 40% and 70% of insects generally could become extinct, simply because there is not enough suitable land and flora to sustain them.

Buglife began mapping out the B-Lines network in 2014, with financial support from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and in partnership with other organisations such as wildlife trusts, local councils and landowners.  “If farmers are choosing where to create more hedgerows or field margins, the map shows them where to focus their efforts,” said Nature Friendly Farming Network’s Martin Lines.

Hopefully these corridors will save England’s bees from extinction, and will be replicated in other locations where the vital pollinators are under threat.

further reading…