The aerospace industry is waking up to its contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, and sees electric engines as a possible solution.

In December 2019, the first fully electric commercial aircraft made a successful test flight from Vancouver, Canada.  Australian company magniX designed the plane’s motor – retrofitted to a DHC-2 de Havilland Beaver seaplane – in partnership with operator Harbour Air.  It flew for 15 minutes.

At the 2019 Paris Airshow, a prototype of a commercial all-electric passenger aircraft was unveiled.  Israel-based company Eviation says “Alice” will be able to carry nine passengers for up to 650 miles, travelling at 276mph, when it enters service in 2022.

Eviation is partnering with Siemens and magniX to provide the electric motors.

For longer-range flights, Rolls-Royce, Airbus and Siemens are working on the E-Fan X programme, which is intended to bring an electric-hybrid aeroplane to customers in 2021.

Meanwhile, Qantas flew a ‘zero-waste’ flight from Sydney to Adelaide in 2019.  About 1,000 single-use plastic items were substituted with sustainable alternatives or removed from the flight.  This follows the airline operating the first biofuel flight between Australia and the United States using biofuel processed from mustard seed.

And finally, airports could become closed-loop environments by banning single-use plastic and enabling better recycling. Gatwick, for example, is working with Hubbub on a pioneering reusable cup trial in partnership with Starbucks.

further reading…

The aerospace industry is waking up to its contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, and sees electric engines as a possible solution.

In December 2019, the first fully electric commercial aircraft made a successful test flight from Vancouver, Canada.  Australian company magniX designed the plane’s motor – retrofitted to a DHC-2 de Havilland Beaver seaplane – in partnership with operator Harbour Air.  It flew for 15 minutes.

At the 2019 Paris Airshow, a prototype of a commercial all-electric passenger aircraft was unveiled.  Israel-based company Eviation says “Alice” will be able to carry nine passengers for up to 650 miles, travelling at 276mph, when it enters service in 2022.

Eviation is partnering with Siemens and magniX to provide the electric motors.

For longer-range flights, Rolls-Royce, Airbus and Siemens are working on the E-Fan X programme, which is intended to bring an electric-hybrid aeroplane to customers in 2021.

Meanwhile, Qantas flew a ‘zero-waste’ flight from Sydney to Adelaide in 2019.  About 1,000 single-use plastic items were substituted with sustainable alternatives or removed from the flight.  This follows the airline operating the first biofuel flight between Australia and the United States using biofuel processed from mustard seed.

And finally, airports could become closed-loop environments by banning single-use plastic and enabling better recycling. Gatwick, for example, is working with Hubbub on a pioneering reusable cup trial in partnership with Starbucks.

further reading…