Infrastructural development in today’s world requires cutting-edge innovation.  Using recycled plastic waste to repave roads is a noble way to counter the environmental problems caused by plastic waste, and at the same time improve the quality of infrastructure.

Shisalanga Construction in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal province on the east coast has laid a section of road that is partly made from plastic.  It has repaved more than 400 metres of road on the outskirts of Durban using asphalt made with the equivalent of 40,000 plastic bottles.

The company uses a thick plastic – high-density polyethylene – that is usually used for milk bottles.  This material replaces 6% of the asphalt’s bitumen, with every ton of asphalt containing the equivalent of up to 128 plastic bottles.

Elsewhere, India started laying plastic roads 17 years ago, and the practice has also been trialled across Europe, North America and Australia.  However, concerns have been raised about the potential carcinogenic gases created during production, and the release of microplastics into the environment as the roads wear away.

further reading…

Infrastructural development in today’s world requires cutting-edge innovation.  Using recycled plastic waste to repave roads is a noble way to counter the environmental problems caused by plastic waste, and at the same time improve the quality of infrastructure.

Shisalanga Construction in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal province on the east coast has laid a section of road that is partly made from plastic.  It has repaved more than 400 metres of road on the outskirts of Durban using asphalt made with the equivalent of 40,000 plastic bottles.

The company uses a thick plastic – high-density polyethylene – that is usually used for milk bottles.  This material replaces 6% of the asphalt’s bitumen, with every ton of asphalt containing the equivalent of up to 128 plastic bottles.

Elsewhere, India started laying plastic roads 17 years ago, and the practice has also been trialled across Europe, North America and Australia.  However, concerns have been raised about the potential carcinogenic gases created during production, and the release of microplastics into the environment as the roads wear away.

further reading…