The Seychelles is protecting the sustainability of its waters thanks to help from an innovative marine conservation plan, which has seen the nation swap its debt in return for funding.

In 2016, The East African nation swapped 5% of its debt (previously owed to countries such as the UK and France) with US charity the Nature Conservancy and several investors – including the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation.  The debt is held by a trust with a lower interest rate, and the Seychelles is committed to spending the savings from the deal (more than $8m) on conservation projects.

Current work includes persuading local fishermen to stop fishing in local waters for six months of the year in order to allow the fish stock to replenish, following many decades of overfishing.  A protected zone is patrolled by the coastguard and air force, and during the six-month ban, the fishermen have to go further out to sea, or take on other jobs.

The Seychelles are vulnerable to rising sea levels.  As well as replenishing the fish stock, which in turn is improving the health of the waters and marine ecology around the islands, it is hoped the work will protect coral reefs, which act as a natural barrier against storm surges.

further reading…

The Seychelles is protecting the sustainability of its waters thanks to help from an innovative marine conservation plan, which has seen the nation swap its debt in return for funding.

In 2016, The East African nation swapped 5% of its debt (previously owed to countries such as the UK and France) with US charity the Nature Conservancy and several investors – including the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation.  The debt is held by a trust with a lower interest rate, and the Seychelles is committed to spending the savings from the deal (more than $8m) on conservation projects.

Current work includes persuading local fishermen to stop fishing in local waters for six months of the year in order to allow the fish stock to replenish, following many decades of overfishing.  A protected zone is patrolled by the coastguard and air force, and during the six-month ban, the fishermen have to go further out to sea, or take on other jobs.

The Seychelles are vulnerable to rising sea levels.  As well as replenishing the fish stock, which in turn is improving the health of the waters and marine ecology around the islands, it is hoped the work will protect coral reefs, which act as a natural barrier against storm surges.

further reading…