A US court has ruled that the grizzly bears in Wyoming and Montana’s Yellowstone National Park cannot be hunted for sport.  The decision was made by the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in response to hunting organisation the US Fish and Wildlife Service and other pro-hunting groups seeking to remove the bears’ protection under the Endangered Species Act.

From the 1970s to 2020, the number of bears in the region increased from just 140 to over 700.  However, a side effect of this recovery was a growing argument from hunting groups including Safari Club International that hunting should now be allowed.  Victory for these groups would have entitled the states of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho to permit eligible people to obtain licences to hunt the bears.

Much of their reasoning was based on the claimed ‘need’ to prevent the bears from roaming beyond the Yellowstone region and killing livestock and even local people.  But on behalf of conservation groups, Tim Preso of EarthJustice argued that the bears had been effectively managed without the need for hunters over the course of the previous four decades.

Although they have bounced back in Yellowstone, there are still only 2,000 grizzly bears on the North American continent south of Canada, compared with 50,000 that historically existed here.  This legal victory, hailed by WildEarth Guardians as “a triumph of science over politics”, should allow the bear population to continue to grow and thrive.

further reading…

A US court has ruled that the grizzly bears in Wyoming and Montana’s Yellowstone National Park cannot be hunted for sport.  The decision was made by the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in response to hunting organisation the US Fish and Wildlife Service and other pro-hunting groups seeking to remove the bears’ protection under the Endangered Species Act.

From the 1970s to 2020, the number of bears in the region increased from just 140 to over 700.  However, a side effect of this recovery was a growing argument from hunting groups including Safari Club International that hunting should now be allowed.  Victory for these groups would have entitled the states of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho to permit eligible people to obtain licences to hunt the bears.

Much of their reasoning was based on the claimed ‘need’ to prevent the bears from roaming beyond the Yellowstone region and killing livestock and even local people.  But on behalf of conservation groups, Tim Preso of EarthJustice argued that the bears had been effectively managed without the need for hunters over the course of the previous four decades.

Although they have bounced back in Yellowstone, there are still only 2,000 grizzly bears on the North American continent south of Canada, compared with 50,000 that historically existed here.  This legal victory, hailed by WildEarth Guardians as “a triumph of science over politics”, should allow the bear population to continue to grow and thrive.

further reading…