The densely forested country of Bhutan officially absorbs more carbon dioxide than it emits, and some commentators say that it should be used as an example to other countries of how to become carbon-neutral.

The Himalayan state’s landmass is 70 per cent forest, which acts as a carbon sink, absorbing an estimated three times as much CO2 as the country of 750,000 people emits.

Although the country’s achievement is largely due to its relatively undeveloped state, and the fact that it is blessed with a natural abundance of forest, the government has taken sustainability into its own hands by no longer measuring progress in terms of GDP growth, but by “Gross National Happiness”, which is focused on protecting Bhutan’s natural environment – its constitution commits the country to ensuring that at least 60% of its landmass is forested.

The country also banned logging exports in 1999, and almost all of its electricity comes from hydropower stations located at its mountain streams, selling the excess it produces to neighbouring countries.  Bhutan has meanwhile pledged to make all of its agriculture organic, and to become waste-free by 2030, and it limits mass tourism by charging a high fee for visitors to enter the country.

further reading…

The densely forested country of Bhutan officially absorbs more carbon dioxide than it emits, and some commentators say that it should be used as an example to other countries of how to become carbon-neutral.

The Himalayan state’s landmass is 70 per cent forest, which acts as a carbon sink, absorbing an estimated three times as much CO2 as the country of 750,000 people emits.

Although the country’s achievement is largely due to its relatively undeveloped state, and the fact that it is blessed with a natural abundance of forest, the government has taken sustainability into its own hands by no longer measuring progress in terms of GDP growth, but by “Gross National Happiness”, which is focused on protecting Bhutan’s natural environment – its constitution commits the country to ensuring that at least 60% of its landmass is forested.

The country also banned logging exports in 1999, and almost all of its electricity comes from hydropower stations located at its mountain streams, selling the excess it produces to neighbouring countries.  Bhutan has meanwhile pledged to make all of its agriculture organic, and to become waste-free by 2030, and it limits mass tourism by charging a high fee for visitors to enter the country.

further reading…