Proposed legislation in California would commit the state to a 75% reduction in plastic waste by 2030 and see it phase out most single-use packaging.  “Single-use plastic packaging is somewhat of a reckless convenience,” said Geoff Shester of the environmental advocacy group Oceana, which lobbied for the legislation.  “But we can’t just put the onus on consumers to solve the problem. We have to get industry involved.”

Two bills – one introduced in the state assembly and one in the Senate – legislate for a 75% reduction in plastic statewide within 10 years.  If passed into law, they would require manufacturers to ensure that all single-use packaging that is produced, sold and distributed in California is fully recyclable or compostable by 2030.  Companies that fail to comply could face up to $50,000 a day in fines.

Meanwhile, San Francisco International Airport (SFO), which restricted the distribution of single-use plastic straws when the city law came into effect in July 2019, is now banning convenience shops, restaurants and vending machines from selling plastic water bottles.  From August 2019, only water in glass, recycled aluminum or certified compostable materials can be sold.

The change is part of SFO’s five-year strategic plan.  Launched in 2016, the plan includes the airport becoming a zero-waste-to-landfill facility by 2021.

Elsewhere in the US, New York’s ban on single-use plastic bags in retail is due to come into effect in March 2020, while Hawaii already has a ban in place on single-use plastic bags.

further reading…

Proposed legislation in California would commit the state to a 75% reduction in plastic waste by 2030 and see it phase out most single-use packaging.  “Single-use plastic packaging is somewhat of a reckless convenience,” said Geoff Shester of the environmental advocacy group Oceana, which lobbied for the legislation.  “But we can’t just put the onus on consumers to solve the problem. We have to get industry involved.”

Two bills – one introduced in the state assembly and one in the Senate – legislate for a 75% reduction in plastic statewide within 10 years.  If passed into law, they would require manufacturers to ensure that all single-use packaging that is produced, sold and distributed in California is fully recyclable or compostable by 2030.  Companies that fail to comply could face up to $50,000 a day in fines.

Meanwhile, San Francisco International Airport (SFO), which restricted the distribution of single-use plastic straws when the city law came into effect in July 2019, is now banning convenience shops, restaurants and vending machines from selling plastic water bottles.  From August 2019, only water in glass, recycled aluminum or certified compostable materials can be sold.

The change is part of SFO’s five-year strategic plan.  Launched in 2016, the plan includes the airport becoming a zero-waste-to-landfill facility by 2021.

Elsewhere in the US, New York’s ban on single-use plastic bags in retail is due to come into effect in March 2020, while Hawaii already has a ban in place on single-use plastic bags.

further reading…